History of Gin

Gin was unheard of in England until the ‘Glorious Revolution’, when William of Orange was crowned King of England in 1688. William came from Holland, the home of juniper flavoured spirits.

Under his rule the spirit we know today as gin quickly became the popular drink of choice in England, and has stayed a national favourite ever since.

‘Sweet gin’ was the norm until the early 19th century, so-called due to the large amount of sugar used to mask the harsh, coarse spirit.

In the 1830s the distillation process was transformed and a much cleaner, smoother gin emerged, with juniper as its definitive flavour.

LONDON DRY GIN

This new style was coined ‘London Dry Gin’ to differentiate it from the sweeter gin and had refreshing yet fully flavoured qualities.

As the gin became more refined, so too did its archetypal drinker. No longer for down-and-outs, gin became the tipple of choice for the discerning London gentry who drank for social pleasure.

Today, London Dry remains the most popular style of gin but is not necessarily produced in London, as most of the city’s 19th century distilleries have now disappeared.

Traditionally distilled with only natural botanicals and a definitive taste of juniper at its heart, No.3 is the epitome of London Dry Gin.

Related links:

Botanicals How No.3 is made Tasting notes
  • William of Orange
  • William Hogarth's Gin Lane
  • Old Pontil Bottles
  • William of Orange
  • William Hogarth's Gin Lane
  • Old Pontil Bottles

No.3 Gin